Returning to the Moment

Last time I mentioned that a good outcome may come for everyone through the way the economy is going and the shedding of excess, if allowed (aka. if people stop screwing with the system). If we ever explore what I mean by “excess”, we will inevitably reach the agreement that such “excess” is related to the pursuit of external, materialistic, glamorous, yet ephemeral, things. The worst part, we have come to want them so badly that we became greedy, and we let our desires take us away from truly living — the “being” part as a human being.

So really, money problem is not money problem. Health problem is not really health problem. Environmental problem is not really environmental problem. All problems we have is but one problem. That would be our way of living, which lead to all those side effects.

There are a lot of names we can call it. Greed. Entitlement mentality. Instant gratification. Attachment to things. It does not really matter what we label it…

In the end, we have simply stopped living. We stop being. Have you ever wondered why we are called human BEINGs?

If you ask me what I am doing with my life now, I will answer you that I am to be present in the moment. All good things happen in the moment, and because I cannot think of a better way to put it, I will quote Shannon Lee, the daughter of Bruce Lee:

My philosophy on life, the thing that I work on the most is to be present in the moment. My father had a saying, to change with change is the changeless state. meaning, being there in the moment, if you are always in the moment then you are taking life head on and you are changing with every moment that comes. You are present and you are aware. It’s sort of the state of perfection to be in, and the place where all good things happen.

The good that can come out of all these pain is for us to return to the moment.

When you are NOT in the moment, you are looking at the past. You are looking at the future. You want all these things so you focus on your desires. You focus solely on your dreams and ideals (notice I said solely, not that dreams and ideals are a bad things). You let greed blinds your sight. You let emotions and thoughts dictate your decision. It is a state of unawareness.

In such state of unawareness, we want external things. We want things to change externally FOR us. We rarely look to ourselves for change. To change with change is the changeless state. To have inner change accompanying the outer change is the changeless state. When we seek only outer change to force the external state to match our desires, we introduce chaos into the system, which leads to consequence (chaos) in order to restore the system into a changeless state. (kind of like the concept of entropy in physics)

At the current state of global economy, a lot of pain is being felt, and it will probably get worse before it gets better. That is my assumption because as pain keeps increasing and reaches a certain threshold, people either break or make. If people don’t break, they will unavoidably have questions in the line of “What the F is going on? This is not working. Something is wrong? What is wrong? Maybe what we are doing is not what we are to do?”

When people ask those questions, that is the beginning of real (inner) change. That will be the starting point of people’s returning to the moment. A way to truly experience life.

Similar to many examples of individuals’ rebound when their life had bottomed out. At that point, they can crash and burn and they may try to run away. Violence could be one such way. Suicide is another. Violence is an unacceptance of the current state and one’s attempt to destroy it (forcing outer change). Suicide is also a denial of the current state where one sees no possibility of outer change and forget about inner change entirely. Both fundamentally display the attachment of how things should be.

On the other hand, when people bottomed out, we all have already heard how many successful came to be because they dug themselves out of it.

Something similar has to happen to the whole population. We are in the bottoming out phase, and we either dig ourselves out or crash and burn. This has to happen collectively while simultaneously, this process of inner change, toward awareness, a kind of awakening, can only occur by each person on his own, if he chooses to, if he desires it bad enough.

That means we will experience life in our unique manner still, each with our own truth, but in a higher statement of awareness, we will be living quite differently, not so destructively, not so all-to-his-own-ly. This is a state where we are truly compassionate to others and nature, not because we should, not because we need them.

Dare I say, if we look beyond all the bureaucracy, dogma, rules, traditions of all religions, this is the principle they share and try to teach — the principle of living in the moment.

Living in the moment does not mean living hedonistically. It is also NOT a carpe diem mentality.

Read Living in the Moment here. I will revisit it also in the next post.

Originally posted 2009-03-04 23:27:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

About Robert Kiyosaki and Rich Dad, Poor Dad

It is safe to say that almost everyone knows, has heard of, or has read the book “Rich Dad and Poor Dad” by Robert Kiyosaki. I myself read the book about 2 years ago. Before I introduce what other people have said about Robert Kiyosaki and his book, let me briefly mention my opinion.

The Good Stuff

  • Encouragement for people to change their mentality and to a paradigm shift in financial thinking — This is a big plus because not being trapped in a narrow perspective and having the right mentality is the first step to do anything right.
  • The importance of passive income — It is necessary to set yourself up with passive income to become financially secure and get rich faster.
  • The mentioning of various financial concepts — I classify this as good stuff because this introduces people to new concepts and therefore, motivates and intrigues people to go out and learn about them. I became more apt to go study how the market and personal finance works. Financial knowledge and literacy is essential for financial security.

The Bad Stuff

  • The mentioning of various financial concepts — I also classify this as bad stuff because I believe he either exaggerates in his stories or provides misleading information. In a few places, he seems to be nearly promoting illegal behaviors.
  • Strong opposition to formal education — I believe formal insitutions still have their practical values and useful knowledges depending on how much individuals make use of the experience. It is detrimental to discourage and turn people away from academia.
  • Negligence to mention or explain the risk in the entrepreneur endeavors that he advocates readers to do — From what I read in news, this has led people to take reckless financial actions leading to financial disasters. I am not holding him responsible because people should think for themselves, but as an author of a “financial book”, he should provide the full picture and cover the topic of risk somewhere… especially in the high-risk financial maneuver he tells people to do.
  • Many vague areas in his stories — This makes me wonder how many of his “successful business” stories are true, and that he created them just to boaster himself and to help sell the book.

In short, I think the book is good in that it incurs people to think about their own finance and to do something about it. It is bad because of possibly misleading, false, and incomplete information, which can lead to dangerous and disastrous consequence if read incorrectly. That’s all from me. Below is what other people have said.

John T. Reed’s analysis of Robert T. Kiyosaki’s book Rich Dad, Poor Dad – I read this VERY detail research and analysis on Robert Kiyosaki and his book recently. Together with the vagueness that I personally noticed in his book, we need to remain skeptical of this man and his words.

Let’s Read Some of Robert Kiyosaki’s Drivel – Silly words spoken by Robert Kiyosaki. This teaches us to do our own research and be cautious and skeptical about advice from “financial advisor”.

Kiyosaki is a Liar? – More “interesting things” said by Robert Kiyosaki!

Rich Dad, Poor Dad :: review – Brian and I agree on the positive points in Rich Dad, Poor Dad.

Book Review: Rich Dad, Poor Dad – Concise review on the book stating the good and the bad.

Cautions on “Rich Dad” Robert Kiyosaki – Frugal talks more about things we need to be careful about the author and his book. He then talks about his view on how to obtain wealth and the importance of formal education.

Robert Kiyosaki, A Smart Investor? – Once again, you probably should not take Robert Kiyosaki seriously when he advises you how to invest. Let’s just keep him as someone who may inspire people to think differently.

Deconstructing Robert Kiyosaki – Trent provides insights into the kind of man who he thinks Robert Kiyosaki is.

Review: Rich Dad, Poor Dad – Full book review by Trent.

It seems that people generally agree on the few ideas Robert Kiyosaki has done correctly on his book, and they also agree on the same skeptical things. It’s probably enough Robert Kiyosaki for one day.

Originally posted 2007-09-20 23:41:10. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Living in the Moment Revisit – Finding Peace

We modern people have more or less gotten used to one way of living.
Allow me to try to sum up in a few words.

If this moment is good, I am happy, enthusiastic, excited, etc… I want more and I will do whatever it takes to get more.
If that moment is bad, I am sad, bored, frustrated, angry, etc… and I don’t want it and will do everything to avoid it.
Basically, we only want to live with the “good stuff” and never with the “bad stuff”.

Not saying that it’s wrong. It is one way of living indeed. However, have you ever thought that we do not have to live like that?

Perhaps you can try living in the moment. You may think this is just a spiritual, philosophical idea. It maybe so, but really, living in the moment is just another way to live life. Personally, I believe that this is the way to fully experience life.

Perhaps we live the way we do now because it has been repeated a million times to us by everyone and everything, in all shapes or forms, that we are to seek happiness in life. I used to think so and even wrote that our ultimate goal is happiness. That’s 2 years ago. Now, I think otherwise.

This leads to my ultimate question for the day.
What if it is not about being happy?

Don’t get me wrong, it is wonderful to be happy. I want to be happy if I can. Surely, we have such preference. It is only natural as human. Being happy is nice and bringing happiness to others around is even nicer. But still, what if it is not about being happy?

I asked that because… well, it is impossible to always be happy. Especially, we can only be happy if there were sad times. And after all these time through learning and self-discovery, I realize, although we cannot always be happy, there is one thing we can always be. Peaceful. We can have peace — through good times and through bad times. We can always have peace.

And peace, is a result of the ability to live in the moment. It is an innate ability that we are all capable of, if we exercise our awareness.

We, everybody, can live in the moment through awareness. With awareness you accept each moment as. Everything here and now. Both good and bad. You exaggerate or deny neither of the opposites. You stop picking and choosing which moment you want and don’t want. You honestly see both good and bad, both happy and sad, and that they are two parts of a whole.

In happy moments, you wield yourself with peace and enjoy it fully, without dramatization nor attachment (trying to hold on to it forever). In sad moments, well, I will not say that you should enjoy it. I believe such is called masochism :) Just that, in the not so good moments, if you can still wield yourself with peace and make the best of it, perhaps greater good may come from the bad times.

Living in the moment.
Seeing things as is.
Fully experience everything.
The so called enlightenment… this is it.
Nothing special.
A lot of people say they want to “get there”, but it is not a destination either.
It’s a ceaseless process by itself.
You can get better at it like everything else, through practice.

How do you get better? You may wonder… I can provide a few suggestions. A large part of it has to deal with learning about yourself.

If living in the moment means experiencing things as is… it means for you to confront yourself. Yep, both the good sides and bad sides. Both the abstract and physical. Both the seen and un-seen. Accept them.

You may have bad thoughts in your mind, and that is okay. We are humans, bad thoughts can happen, but you can choose actions to take as to not to materialize it. Accept the bad thoughts. Accept the bad emotions. There are just as many good counterparts if not more. By being aware and accepting them, you learn about yourself.

Conversely, you can learn about yourself through your actions. Actions speak louder than words. If you allow yourself to be aware of your own actions, you learn about yourself. By seeing everything, you learn to honestly choose what you do not want for yourself next time.

You can also learn about yourself through other people. By that I mean, what you often see in other people is most likely what you see yourself as. You may deny it. But if you allow this observation, you may get past the denial easier!

Nobody else can do any of these for you. Only you can learn about yourself. Other people and things may serve as mirrors and guides, but that is it. Bruce Lee said (paraphrased), “All types of knowledge leads to self-knowledge. And ultimately, there is only self-help.” I believe he is on to something.

When you can finally see your true self and accept your whole self, you can finally see the reality as it is and do the best you can. You will have inner peace. You can also do your best. You can also honestly express your self because you are no longer all the different things you are supposed to be. When more and more people awake to themselves and the moment, we can stop declaring war on everything.

As of now, we are really fighting with everything that crosses our path. We even fight with ourselves because we even reject parts of what we are but what we are not supposed to be. We reject what we are not supposed to be because we are supposed to be something else.

We are supposed to prosper (continuously?). We are supposed to become rich (quickly?). We are supposed to be righteous. We are supposed to be religious. We are supposed to donate. We are supposed to be happy. We are supposed to be equal. We are supposed to have certain level of living standard. We are supposed to have this and that.

We are not supposed to be unhappy. We are not supposed to depressed. We are not supposed to think evil thoughts. We are not supposed to be fat. We are not supposed to be poor. We are not supposed to offend other people.

I am no genius, but currently, don’t we have much more of the “not supposed to be” that “supposed to be”? And no wonder most people are tired, burnt out and not healthy, all these “supposed to be” and “not supposed to be”. So many to keep up with! We fight with ourselves internally because of these, and the fighting is manifesting itself in all the problems we face now.

Because of not living in the moment, we do not perceive everyone as human beings are of a whole, and let alone perceiving everything around us, and including ourselves, as a part of nature. We segregate by cultures, religions, families, names, groups, committees, advocates, trends, favorite celebrities, favorite sports, clothing, personalities…

I am not saying we are not to be any of the “supposed to be” or not be any of the “not supposed to be”. Neither am I saying we are supposed to be homogeneous.

It is great to have all the differences we have. That is the beauty of reality. But, those differences should not divide us. Yet, we allow them to divide ourselves, by us choosing what is “supposed to be” and “not supposed to be”. We want this and not that. We live by what we want. We each have our own incentives. In other words… Me, me, MEEEE!

Perhaps one day we can stop declaring war on everything.
One day we stop dividing amongst ourselves.
One day we can let go of all the “supposed to be” and “not supposed to be”.
One day each of us decides who we want to be through being aware, learning the self, and critically deciding actions to take.
One day we live in the moment and simply be, which is way simpler than keeping up with all those “supposed”. (Maybe then we won’t be so busy and tired)
One day everyone lives and treats other as human beings.
One day we live as a part of nature, instead of trying to be the owner. (I said trying because we will never become)
One day we can treat other creatures rightfully who are also part of this greater whole.
One day we can truly live, instead of trying so hard to live that we forget to live.
One day we can all live in the moment.

I hope that day will come.

Dare I say, this is the essense of all types of religions in the world, in their most original forms. Many of them preach love, kindness, compassion, courage. Well, true love, true kindness, true compassion, and true courage all spring forth from being in the moment, and by knowing your true self.

Dare I also say the following. Living in the moment and having inner peace may not make you the most successful and richest person in the world, but you will have something that worth way more and for now, very few have. You will have the moment, your true self, and peace.

The day the majority people can live in the moment, the day there will be a shift in the way we live as a society, but this has to start from the individual level. Each person doing his or her part.

Originally posted 2009-03-10 23:05:46. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Temet Nosce — We cannot change anything unless we accept it — from Carl Jung lecture

Why “know thyself”? How do we handle ourselves and others and relationships in between properly? Why acceptance, of both good and evil? How to be compassionate? Why words are so futile? Why pretense never works? Why gives a shit? Even the question, how do we “save the world”?

In this world that is yet dictated by 19th centry Newtonian mechanics and Freudian psychological concept of libido (and thus the suppression of it), this powerful and refreshing Carl Jung excerpt provides hints that originated from a lecture a group of clergy .

Note: not answers.

Something to think about before launching a war (with drugs and psycho-analysis) against your own “libido” or some “wild unconsciousness”.
Something to think about before calling a fight against something “evil” out there from some “moral high ground”.
Something to think about before trying to save the world.


“People forget that even doctors have moral scruples and that certain patients’ confessions are hard even for a doctor to swallow. Yet the patient does not feel himself accepted unless the very worst in him is accepted too. No one can bring this about by mere words, it comes only through reflexion and through the doctors attitude towards himself and his own dark side.

If the doctor wants to guide another or even accompany him a step of the way, he must feel with that person’s psyche. He never feels it when he passes judgment. wether he puts his judgment into words or keeps them to himself makes not the slightest difference. To take the opposite position and to agree with the patient off-hand is also of no use, but estranges him as much as condemnation. This feeling comes only through unprejudiced objectivity.

This sounds almost like a scientific precept and it could be confused with a purely intellectual abstract attitude of mind, but what I mean is something quite different.

It is a human quality, a kind of deep respect for the facts, for the man who suffers from them, and for the riddle of such a man’s life. The truly religious person has this attitude: he knows that god has brought all sorts of strange and inconceivable things to pass and seeks in the most curious of ways to enter a mans heart. He therefore senses in everything the unseen presence of the divine will. This is what I mean by unprejudiced objectivity, it is a moral achievement on the part of the doctor, who ought not to be repelled by sickness and corruption.

We cannot change anything unless we accept it. Condemnation does not liberate, it oppresses and I am the oppressor of the person I condemn, not his friend and fellow sufferer. I do not in the least mean to say that we must never pass judgment when we desire to help and improve, but if the doctor wishes to help a human being he must be able to accept him as he is, and he can do this in reality only when he has already seen and accepted himself as he is.

Perhaps this sounds very simple, but simple things are always the most difficult.

In actual life it requires the greatest art to be simple, and so acceptance of one’s self is the essence of the moral problem and the acid test of one’s whole outlook on life. That I feed the beggar, that I forgive an insult, that I love my enemy in the name of Christ; all these are undoubtedly great virtues. What I do unto the least of my brethren, that I do unto Christ.

But what if I should discover that the least amongst them all, the poorest of all beggars, the most imputed of all offenders, yay that the very fiend himself, that these are within me, and that I myself stand in need of my own kindness, that I myself am the enemy who must be loved, what then?

Then, as a rule, the whole truth of Christianity is reversed. there is then no more talk of love and long-suffering. We say to the brother within us: “raka!” and condemn and rage against ourselves. We hide him from the world, we deny ever having met this least of the lowly in ourselves, and had it been God himself who drew near to us in this despicable form, we should have denied him a thousand times before a single cock had crowed.”

Originally posted 2010-03-24 22:38:51. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Pages: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ... 87 88 89 Next

Subscribe using Email

Get notified of new posts by email.